++FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS++

UNFUN FACT:

MOLLUSCUM DOESN'T COME WITH A MANUAL.

Molluscum appears as bumps with a dent in the middle flesh-colored, white, pink, or red in color. These bumps may have a white, waxy core bumps range in size from a pinhead to a pencil eraser. Most people have 10-30 bumps, but some children may have as many as 100.

Bumps can appear anywhere on the skin but most commonly appear on the trunk, the armpit, arms and legs and can even appear on the face.

The average patient will have the infection for 13 months, but some patients can have the infection for two years or more. 1 out of 10 cases last two years or longer.

Molluscum is extremely contagious and can spread between people when infected skin touches healthy skin or when objects like towels, clothing, or sports gear that have touched the infected skin are shared.1&2

Yes, Molluscum Contagiousum can spread when someone touches the bumps and then touches other parts of their body.

While covering each bump with clothing or bandages prevents the virus from spreading to other people it also stops those infected from spreading it to other parts of their body.

Disinfect household surfaces and toys regularly, have kids take showers instead of bathing, or disinfect the tub between children (do not co-bathe). Also avoid sharing contaminated items like towels/loofas/bath sponges, toys or sports equipment while the bumps are present.

Because molluscum can be transmitted to other parts of the body if the bumps are scratched or injured, the infection can spread to surrounding skin.

Because of the contagious nature of molluscum for children, close contact activities may be restricted to prevent the spread of molluscum from child to child.

Molluscum is a highly contagious viral skin infection that affects an estimated 6 million people in the United States, primarily impacting children under the age of 16.1&2

Consider speaking to a dermatologist to determine the best course of action for your family and child.

FIND A DERMATOLOGIST

When managing molluscum contagiosum you might consider speaking to a dermatologist to determine the best course of action for your family and child.

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